Page tree
Skip to end of metadata
Go to start of metadata

For cPanel & WHM version 62

Overview

cPanel & WHM uses VirtFS to provide a jailed shell environment for users who connect to a server via SSH. The jailed shell acts as a container for the user, and does not allow the user to access other users' home directories on the server.

  • Unlike a normal shell environment, a jailed shell environment increases  security for a server's other users.
  • Users in a jailed shell environment can run otherwise-unavailable commands (for example, crontab and passwd). 

The /home/virtfs/ directory

Warning:

Do not use the rm command to remove any mounted file or directory within the /home/virtfs/ directory. 

  • If you run the rm command on any mounted file or directory within the /home/virtfs/ directory, you will also delete all of the files in the directory to which it is mounted.
  • This action will render your server nonfunctional.

When a user logs in to a jailed shell environment via SSH or SFTP for the first time, the system creates the /home/virtfs/ directory. This directory contains configuration files, utilities, and BIND mounts.

  • You cannot prevent the creation of this directory or disable it.
  • This directory does not use any disk space. However, because it is a virtual mount point, some commands (for example, du) report that the directory uses disk space.
  • BIND mounts create a virtual link between two locations on the file system. 
    • For example, if a user views the contents of the /home/virtfs/username/usr/bin/ directory, the user actually sees the contents of the /usr/bin/ directory.
    • For more information about BIND mounts, run the man 8 mount command.

Notes:

  • Servers that run CentOS 7, CloudLinux™ 7, or Red Hat® Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 7 may use additional mount points for common system paths (for example, /usr/bin). Do not dismount these mount points.
  • On servers that run CentOS 7, CloudLinux 7, or RHEL 7, the /etc/mtab symlink points to the /proc/self/mounts file.

Enable a jailed shell environment

WHM includes two options to activate a jailed shell environment. The option that you use depends on the type of users for whom you wish to enable jailed shells.

To enable a jailed shell environment for all new and modified users, use the Use cPanel® jailshell by default option in WHM's  Tweak Settings interface (Home >> Server Configuration >> Tweak Settings).

  • This option allows you to force the use of a jailed shell for new accounts and accounts that you subsequently edit in the following interfaces:
    • WHM's Modify An Account interface (Home >> Account Functions >> Modify An Account).
    • WHM's Upgrade/Downgrade An Account interface (Home >> Account Functions >> Upgrade/Downgrade An Account).
  • This option does not affect accounts that already exist on the server but that you have not edited in these interfaces.

To enable a jailed shell environment for a specific user, use WHM's Manage Shell Access interface (Home >> Account Functions >> Manage Shell Access). 

Note:

When you enable jailed shell access for a user, the system sets the user's shell to the /usr/local/cpanel/bin/jailshell location.

Exim and VirtFS

When a user's shell location is /usr/local/cpanel/bin/jailshell (jailed shell is enabled) or /usr/local/cpanel/bin/noshell (all shells are disabled), Exim runs any process from alias or filter files inside VirtFS. This action provides extra security because Exim commands run in a jailed shell and do not affect other users.

CSF or LFD alerts

If you use a utility that monitors system changes (for example, CFS or LFD), you may see an alert that resembles the following example after you upgrade:

The following list of files have FAILED the md5sum comparison test. This means that the file has been changed in some way.
This could be a result of an OS update or application upgrade. If the change is unexpected it should be investigated:
 
/bin/crontab: FAILED
/bin/passwd: FAILED 

This is a false positive warning. cPanel & WHM uses the /bin/crontab and /bin/passwd symlinks to link to files in the /usr/bin directory. These symlinks allow jailed shell environments to access the crontab and passwd commands.

Disable or remove a jailed shell environment

Warning:

You cannot completely remove the jailed shell system (VirtFS). The directions below remove a jailed shell environment, but cannot prevent the recreation of the jailed shell environment.

The following processes may recreate the jailed shell environment:

  • Exim processing filters.
  • Piped email addresses.
  • Cron jobs.
  • Jailed Apache virtual hosts that use the mod_ruid2 module via the EXPERIMENTAL: Jail Apache Virtual Hosts using mod_ruid2 and cPanel® jailshell option in WHM's  Tweak Settings  interface (Home >> Server Configuration >> Tweak Settings).

Disable the jailed shell environment

Warning:

You cannot disable the /home/virtfs/ directory for your users, even if you disable jailed shell access. For more information about the /home/virtfs/ directory, read the The /home/virtfs/ directory section above. 

To disable the jailed shell environment for a specific user, use WHM's Manage Shell Access interface (Home >> Account Functions >> Manage Shell Access).

To disable the jailed shell environment for all of the users on your server, perform the following steps:

  1. Disable the Use cPanel® jailshell by default option in WHM's  Tweak Settings  interface (Home >> Server Configuration >> Tweak Settings).
  2. Select Disabled Shell for all of the server's accounts in WHM's Manage Shell Access interface (Home >> Account Functions >> Manage Shell Access).

Note:

When you disable jailed shell access, the system sets the users' shells to the /usr/local/cpanel/bin/noshell location. With this location, the user retains access to SFTP in a non-jailed environment.

Remove a user's jailed shell environment

To remove a jailed shell environment, perform the following steps:

  1. Disable the jailed shell environment for the user in WHM's  Manage Shell Access  interface ( Home >> Account Functions >> Manage Shell Access ).
  2. To unmount the VirtFS BIND mounts, run the following command, where username is the desired account username:

    umount /home/virtfs/username/usr/bin

The /scripts/clear_orphaned_virtfs_mounts script

You can run the /scripts/clear_orphaned_virtfs_mounts script to unmount the BIND mounts for users who no longer exist or who no longer use a jailed shell environment.

  • This script removes the /home/virtfs/username/ directory and its contents, where username is an affected account's username.
  • To force the removal of all VirtFS mount points, run the following command:

    /scripts/clear_orphaned_virtfs_mounts --clearall

To check your system for VirtFS mount points, run the following command, where username is the desired account username:

grep -i username /proc/mounts

Additional documentation